ENVIRONMENT ISSUES IN DELHI

ENVIRONMENT ISSUES IN DELHI
ENVIRONMENT ISSUES IN DELHI

 ENVIRONMENT ISSUES IN DELHI

Environmental problems in Delhi, India, are a threat to the well-being of the city’s and area’s inhabitants as well as the flora and fauna. Delhi, the sixth-most environment issue in delhi   populated metropolis in the world (second largest if the entire NCR is included), is one of the most heavily polluted cities in India,having for instance one of the country’s highest volumes of particulate matter pollution. In May 2014 the World Health Organisation announced New Delhi as the most polluted city in the world environment issue in delhi  .

ENVIRONMENT ISSUES IN DELHI
ENVIRONMENT ISSUES IN DELHI

Overpopulation and the ensuing overuse of scarce resources such as water put heavy pressure on the environment environment issue in delhi  . The city suffers from air pollution caused by road dust and industry, with comparatively smaller contributions from unclean engines in transportation, especially diesel-powered city buses and trucks, and 2-wheelers and 3-wheelers with two-stroke engine

these are environment issue in delhi  . Noise pollution comes mainly from motorcycle and automobile traffic. Water pollution and a lack of solid waste treatment facilities have caused serious damage to the river on whose banks Delhi grew, the Yamuna. Besides human and environmental damage, pollution has caused economic damage as well; Delhi may have lost the competition to host the 2014 Asian Games because of its poor environment environment issue in delhi   .

 SOURCE OF POLLUTION

The current majority of analysis sources are hinting towards colder weather, stagnant winds trapping the various sources of smoke. The primary sources of smoke are stubble burning, lit garbage, road dust, power plants, factories, and vehicles.

Air quality can be measured by the amount of PM 2.5 and PM 10 particulates suspended in air. On Nov 7, 2017 the PM 2.5 levels in Delhi shot up to 999, much above the recommended 60 micrograms. At the same time PM 10 shot to 999 (the maximum level for the monitors), instead of the recommended limit of 100.

Again on 8 November 2017 the PM 2.5 levels shot up to 449 (recommended is 60 micrograms). At the same time PM 10 shot to 663

EFFECT OF POLLUTION

In what has become a chronic condition for the city of 22 million, New Delhi is once again choking on extremely high levels of air pollution. In parts of the city, air quality index (AQI) readings have hit 999—the equivalent of smoking 45 cigarettes a day.
But 999 is the maximum reading on air monitors, which means actual levels are likely higher.
AQI is based on measurements of PM2.5, the tiny particulate matter pollution produced through combustion—it’s released by burning coal, running diesel engines, and burning crops in neighboring states, all major sources of pollution for the city. PM2.5 is small enough to slip deep into lungs, aggravating asthma and contributing to a range of health effects.“I feel breathless even inside my car. I can’t keep the windows of my house open,” New Delhi businessman Nishank Dadu told the BBC. “Delhi has become a gas chamber and nobody seems to be doing anything to improve the situation.”The dense smog is being blamed for car crashes, including a 24-car motorway pileup just outside the city, according to the Telegraph.
PM2.5 air pollution hits babies and the elderly hardest, and exposure in the womb has long been associated with an array of adverse birth outcomes like preterm birth and low birth weight .

But residents don’t just have PM2.5 to worry about. Other air pollution molecules, like the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in diesel exhaust, are known to raise cancer risk, especially in people exposed to the stuff as a fetus. Other pollutants affect the heart; still others are neurotoxins. Air pollution aBut residents don’t just have PM2.5 to worry about. Other air pollution molecules, like the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in diesel exhaust, are known to raise cancer risk, especially in people exposed to the stuff as a fetus. Other pollutants affect the heart; still others are neurotoxins. Air pollution also impairs immune development in utero, making it harder for those exposed to fight infection later in life.lso impairs immune development in utero, making it harder for those exposed to fight infection later in life.

Globally, chronic exposure to air pollution causes roughly 7 million people to die prematurely each year.Globally, chronic exposure to air pollution causes roughly 7 million people to die prematurely each year environment issue in delhi .

Three years after rolling out the Swachh Bharat (Clean India) campaign, which among other things aims to eradicate open defecation by 2019, India is far from solving its filth problem.
Over 70% of rural India still lacks adequate sanitation facilities, World Bank data shows. Over 56% of Indians—some 732.2 million of them—lack access to basic sanitation. Globally, these are the worst numbers, according to a 2017 report by the international charity WaterAid. The situation is so grim that girls drop out of school due to a dearth of functional toilets on campus
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Meanwhile, only around a quarter each of the 2.5 million household toilets and 100,000 public facilities that the Narendra Modi government had promised to build by March 2016 are ready. Where available, restrooms are often filthy and breeding grounds for deadly diseases—one in 10 deaths in the country occur due to poor hygiene. Faecal-sludge management remains subpar, with water bodies and municipal sewers often used to dispose of human waste. Clearly, the government’s efforts have so far been no match for the mammoth task at hand.
But the sordid state of affairs even offers a huge business opportunity—a $62 billion market by 2021—for global and homegrown companies in what is referred to as the sanitation economy by the Toilet Board Coalition (TBC). The three-year-old TBC, a global consortium of companies, social investors, sanitation experts and non-profits, aims to catalyse market-based solutions to fulfil the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goal of achieving adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and ending open defecation by 2030 .

STEPS TO CONTROL  POLLUTION

Government’s steps to control pollution in Delhi
There are mobile enforcement teams deployed at various locations for monitoring polluting vehicles and vehicles not having PUC certificates.
A Mass Rapid Transport System (MRTS) is being constructed with the aim of providing a non-polluting, useful and affordable rail-based mass rapid transit system for Delhi, integrated with other modes of transport.
With a view to reducing vehicular pollution, there has been a ban imposed on the plying of more than 15 years old commercial/transport vehicles, taxis and autos that run on conventional fuels, including diesel driven city buses.
There has also been tightening of mass emission standards for new vehicles.
The quality of the fuel being supplied in Delhi has been significantly improved over the years by the ban of selling leaded petrol, introduction of low sulphur diesel, reduction of sulphur and benzene content in petrol.
There has been regular placement of dustbins, purchase of additional front-end loaders, mechanical sweepers, dumper placers, tipper trucks, to collect and dispose of garbage.
Steps are taken to transform garbage into compost by developing new sanitary land-fill sites.
The Delhi Government has constituted a committee to implement the Bio-Medical Waste (management and handling) Rules, 1998.
The Delhi Degradable Plastic Bag (Manufacture, Sale and Usage) and Garbage (Control) Act 2000 has been enacted for banning the manufacture and use of plastic bags, etc .
It’s not that the Government is not taking steps to control pollution in Delhi. But we need proper and efficient implementation of plans and programmes and policies launched by the Government.
How can citizens of Delhi help in reducing pollution?
Pollution in Delhi is a perpetual problem which need to be looked upon as a serious issue not only by the Government but also by the citizens of the city.
One of the easiest ways is that there should be an efficient involvement of Resident Welfare Associations in various localities in collection, segregation of garbage from houses and the societies.
Citizens can take steps to covert the garbage into compost in their localities.
More and more trees must be planted in every locality.
Every individual should keep a proper check on the pollution level of their vehicles.
Making more use of CNG.
One of the best ways to control pollution is to manage wastes of all types in a proper manner.
Each and every citizen should abide by the 3Rs: Recycle, Reuse, Reduce.
More and more people should use bus and metro instead of cars and scooters, as they can carry a lot more people in one journey. Car pool is also a good option.
Controlling the use of energy and making use of electricity in an efficient manner.
One can also reduce water pollution by reducing the use of chemicals, cleaning agents, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers etc.
It is the duty of every citizen to think in a broader perspective to control pollution. We really don’t want our future generations to live in an unhealthy environment in Delhi. We really don’t want our children or our elders to get into incessant coughing due to pollution. Like we say charity begins at home, I take a pledge to do what I can for my environment and protect it to the best I can. If each one of us takes a pledge to do our bit for our environment, I am sure Delhi will be a better place to live in. Even a small step counts…