WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU HAVE A FEVER

WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU HAVE A FEVER

WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU HAVE A FEVER
WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU HAVE A FEVER

What’s a fever?

A fever–as anybody who has come down with the flu knows–is a raised body temperature. It’s a typical medical sign.

When you are fighting an illness, the portion of your brain responsible for regulating temperature, known as the hypothalamus, kicks up your internal thermostat. It is a part of the body’s way of protecting itself from those foreign invaders.

Gustavo Ferrer, MD, president of Intensive Care Experts in Weston, Florida, says some fevers can be treated at home, while others require medical care. The right response depends on an individual’s age, symptoms, overall wellness, and how large the fever spikes, he clarifies.

 

Causes

Fever can be brought on by a range of factors:

WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU HAVE A FEVER
WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU HAVE A FEVER

1.an infection, such as strep throat, flu, chickenpox, or pneumonia
2.rheumatoid arthritis
3.some medicines
4.overexposure of skin to sunlight, or sunburn
5.heat stroke, resulting either by exposure to high temperatures or prolonged 6.strenuous exercise
7.dehydration
8.silicosis, a type of lung disease caused by long-term exposure to silica dust
amphetamine abuse
9.alcohol withdrawal

 

Symptoms

When somebody comes with a fever, symptoms, and signs are connected to what is called sickness behavior, and may include:

* feeling chilly when nobody else does
* shivering
* lack of desire
* dehydration – preventable when the individual drink plenty of fluids
* depression
* hyperalgesia, or increased sensitivity to pain
* lethargy
* issues concentrating
* sleepiness
* sweating

If the fever is high, there might also be intense irritability, confusion, delirium, and seizures.

Types

Fevers can be classified based on how long they survive, whether or not they go and come, and just how high they are.

Severity

A fever can be:
low tier, from 100.5-102.1 °F or 38.1-39 °C
moderate, from 102.2-104.0 °F or 39.1-40 °C
high, from 104.1 to 106.0 °F to or 40.1-41.1 °C
hyperpyrexia, over 106.0 °F or 41.1 °C
The elevation of this temperature might help indicate what type of difficulty is causing it.

A fever may be:

 

Read on to find out more about fever in adults and kids, what you could do to break a fever, and if to see a doctor.

Verify your thermometer

WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU HAVE A FEVER
WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU HAVE A FEVER

Right off the bat, even if you think you have a fever, take your temperature. Body temps differ from person to person, through the day, and due to other variables–even during childbirth in women who menstruate. If your thermometer reads a level lower or higher than average, do not sweat it.
You input fever land once your temperature reaches 100.4 or above. (A rectal temperature is thought to be the most accurate gauge in young kids.)
While fevers are usually caused by viruses, like the ones that lead to colds or the flu, fevers can also indicate bacterial diseases (such as strep throat or a UTI), specific inflammatory and immune disorders (such as rheumatoid arthritis), or influenza.

Pay no mind to the old saying, “feed a cold, starve a fever” In truth, colds can produce fever also, and when you’re fighting a fever, fluids are the friend.
“Fever will dehydrate you, and you have to replace what you have lost,” explains Dr. Ferrer, who also serves as manager of the pulmonary fellowship program at Aventura Hospital and Medical Center.

Water, tea, and chicken broth are all wise choices. Your pediatrician may recommend an electrolyte solution to get a young kid.

No appetite? Don’t eat!

As soon as your body is feverish because of an illness of some type, you may also have an upset stomach or nausea, not to mention a lack of appetite. It can be tough to keep down food or merely unappealing to eat, Dr. Ferrer explains, so “never force anybody to consume.” In a famous study published nearly two decades ago, researchers demonstrated that chicken soup does have medicinal properties. It slows the motion of infection-fighting white blood cells, and that activity is believed to help alleviate upper respiratory symptoms.

Stay comfortably trendy

There’s no evidence that layering on blankets “and seeking to sweat out the fever” has some benefit, Dr. Ferrer says.

Instead, you will probably feel better if you stay cool, he says. One way to beat the heat is to have a lukewarm or cold shower or bath at a temperature that is comfortable for you. Implementing cold compresses to the neck, armpits, or forehead can also help cool the skin through evaporation. These methods will not deal with the cause of the uterus–however, they can help alleviate some discomfort as your body fights off a bug.

Get a rest When you have a fever, it means your immune system is working overtime to combat anything disease or disease is making you sick.

Give your body a fighting a chance of catching a few winks.

Take a fever reducer Aspirin is also used in adults but should never be given to children or teenagers. It’s been linked to a rare illness named Reye’s syndrome that causes brain swelling and liver damage in young people battling a viral infection, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Automobiles: Make sure to administer the correct dose of acetaminophen or aspirin based on your child’s age and weight. And be aware that acetaminophen might be concealed in many over-the-counter medications taken to alleviate cold and flu symptoms. You do not need to make too much, Dr. Ferrer warns because it “has been one of the most common causes of liver failure.”

Take your sick child to the Physician

Fever in children six weeks to 5 years old can trigger the febrile seizure, a kind of seizure that happens within the first few hours of a fever.

It’s also advisable to call a doctor if your child is feverish and appears very ill, is unusually drowsy, is quite fussy, or has other symptoms, like a stiff neck, a severe headache, a sore throat, ear pain, and an unexplained rash, or repeated vomiting or diarrhea.

A worsening fever or one which hangs for more than two days in a tot younger than 2 or three days at an older child also requires medical attention, as does a higher fever. Some clinicians define “high fever” in kids as a temperature of 102 degrees or over. “High fever, going beyond 103, is a red flag,” Dr. Ferrer states.

 

Therapy

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) such as Tylenol (paracetamol) or ibuprofen can help bring a fever down. However, a moderate fever might be helping combat the bacterium or virus that’s causing the infection. It may not be ideal to bring it down.

If a bacterial infection caused the fever, the physician might prescribe an antibiotic.

If a fever has been brought on by a cold, which is brought on by viral disease, NSAID’s may be used to relieve uncomfortable symptoms. Antibiotics don’t have any effect against viruses and will not be prescribed by your physician for a fungal infection.

Fluid intake: Anyone with a fever should have plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration. Dehydration will complicate any illness.

Heat stroke: NSAIDs won’t be successful if the person’s fever was due to hot weather or continuing strenuous exercise. The patient has to be cooled. If they’re confused or unconscious, then they need to be treated by a doctor immediately.

Take into the doctor

In adults, a fever of less than 101 is considered mild. At 103 degrees or higher, it’s a different story. “If you’ve got a temperature that is going beyond 103 or 104 and it’s persistent, this is the time that you have got to consider seeing the doctor,” Dr. Ferrer states.

He informs patients to note the constellation of symptoms which accompany their fever. Burning with urination in addition to a fever, as an example may be an indication of a urinary tract infection.

Seek emergency maintenance Shortness of breath is an early sign of respiratory failure and should be taken very seriously, he adds.

If your child undergoes a fever-induced seizure that does not stop after five minutes, dial 911 or your local emergency number, the AAP advises.

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